About US

Where we have as much fun as our customers

COHO is a weird store!

We don’t apologize. In fact, it’s kind of our thing. We buy salvage, surplus and overstock from trucking companies, manufacturers, distributors and online retailers. Typically we don’t know what we are buying until it shows up. This seemingly foolish business model is how we can sell stuff so cheap. By purchasing truckloads of unknown products, we incur certain risks and thus demand lower prices from the sellers and pass that savings on to you.

You never know what you are going to find at COHOOur shelves are piled high with

Automotive

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Books

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Baby &
Childcare

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Electronics &
Accessories

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Furniture &
Lighting

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Health &
Beauty

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Industrial

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Pet Supplies

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Tools &
Hardware

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and Much more!

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Frequently asked questions

Where does all this stuff come from?

We like to say, “Everything gets here by accident.” Whether a trucking company damages a carton, a retailer over-orders, or a manufacturer builds too much product, they eventually need to cut their losses and liquidate the merchandise.

Why Sedro-Woolley?

Our prices are too low! No, really. Many manufacturers and distributors prohibit us from selling product within a certain distance of authorized retailers. Our retail prices are often cheaper than the big guys pay wholesale. Besides… Sedro-Woolley is a nice little town.

What is the weirdest thing you’ve ever sold?

We get this question a lot and the answer is always changing. About the time we think we’ve seen it all, something comes through the door that surprises us. However, some highlights include coffins, an industrial laser, a cryogenic freezer, a 10-ft tall marble crucifix, a fuselage for an amphibious airplane, and an infrared railroad scanner worth $250,000.

What is Freight Salvage?

When most people think of freight salvage, they think of roll-over semis. Typically the salvage COHO buys is not nearly that exciting. Salvage also happens as dock workers move freight on pallets, or simply by boxes rubbing against each other as a truck jostles down the road. Sometimes freight gets separated from its paperwork. Trucking companies call this “over freight,”